What Makes a Pro?

By Mickey Myers

As Bryan Memorial Gallery firms up its Cabin Fever Series of lectures, workshops and demonstrations this winter, a theme presents itself.  Like last year, when art travel unfolded throughout the Gallery’s events, this year we notice opportunities for professional development unfolding throughout our offerings.

What one understands to be “professional development” varies from profession to profession.  It can be a requirement for maintaining a license or even a job (“publish or perish” comes to mind) or it can be much less definable, such as an opportunity for growth in a practice, a collaborative occasion or technical assistance.

Annelein workshopHere at Bryan Memorial Gallery we aim to help our artists advance professionally.  While acknowledging that some don’t need our help, it gratifying when our artists tell us that something the Gallery did – a program, an exhibit, the specs for a show, an artists roundtable – had an impact on one’s studio practice.  A gallery director lives for that kind of affirmation, while at the same time taking care not to impose one’s modus operandi on others, especially not artists.

So it is gratifying to us, as we put together the Cabin Fever Series for this winter, to find ourselves providing some specific and clear cut opportunities for our artists to improve their lot and evaluate their studio practice in relation to best practices in the field.

The following presentations are just those opportunities:

March 10, 1 – 4  Talking about Your Artwork with Mary Zompetti

Mary Zompetti is known primarily for her photography, but she has a significant career helping artists, no matter what their medium or the stage of their career.  She’s coming over for a very small and intimate afternoon of talk with the first 6 artists who sign up for this workshop about their work.  The conversation will be exactly that – a conversation among 6 artists about their studio practice – what works and what doesn’t, what happens when one hits a wall, how long can we stay on course and what are the signs we need to shift gears; where do we go to refresh?   Participating artists are asked to bring 3 examples of their work, including a very recent example.

  • There is no charge for this workshop, and it is first come, first served but advanced registration is required.  Register here.

March 11, 9 – 3  iPhone Photography:  Refining Your Artistic Vision with Nan Carle Beauregard

Most of us have iPhones or Smart Phones and many of us are integrating them into our studio practice.  This is where Nan comes in to assist us in maximizing our understanding of iPhotography, in ways that can enhance its role in our studio practice.  The only thing you have to bring to their workshop is your iPhone or smart phone.  Photographer Nan Carle Beauregard is keen on the story of life and how iPhone Photography can help tell one’s story.  Her editing process enhances an already good photo.  She will also work with participants in the creative exploration of new images.


Saturday, March 17, 1 – 3 PM  A Conversation with Katharine Montstream about Marketing Your Artwork

Kath Montstream and TangoKatharine Montstream is one of Vermont’s iconic landscape artists.  From the brilliance of her watercolors to the depth of her oils, from the accessibility of her prints and cards to the expansiveness of her community involvement, Montstream represents the vitality of the arts in Vermont today.

Spend St. Patrick’s Day afternoon with Montstream while she discusses stories from her own career about marketing her art:  how she got started, what she learned early, what has helped her establish herself in the minds of many as “Vermont’s Favorite,” and what she is still learning today.

  • There is no charge for this program, but seating is limited – first come, first served.

Saturday, March 24, 1 – 3 PM Painting Demonstration with Eric Tobin

Eric painting 1 croppedBack again for the third straight year: the gallery’s best-attended demonstration with Eric Tobin, one of Vermont’s most popular artists.   Watch Eric paint a painting from start to finish.  Converse with him about the decisions he makes while painting. Listen to him explain not only his painting methods, but how he organizes and equips to paint outdoors all year round.

  • There is no charge and no advanced registration required.  

Sunday, March 25, 1 – 3 PM  Framing Your Artwork, 102.

Lassie Barile and Fiona Cooper Fenwick of Vermont Frameworks (Waterbury Center) presented Framing Your Artwork, 101 last winter, and despite a snowstorm, those present hung around with many questions.  Barile and Fenwick are returning, and this time are asking those who attend to submit questions in advance, so they can prepare examples of the answers.


April 26 10 – 1PM  The Legacy Workshop with Mary Fillmore and Mickey Myers.

Many of our artists and others around the state have had the opportunity to attend a 3 hour Legacy Workshop with Mary and Mickey under a grant from the Vermont Community Foundation.  This workshop helps artists (and their heirs) prepare for the inevitable – which is to say that time flies when you’re painting, and sooner or later, you find yourself with an abundance of sketches, finished works, drawings, materials, and what to do with it all?  Certainly, it is nothing you want to leave for your family to figure out without your input, but where, when and how to convey that input?  This workshops helps, and further, this is probably the last time it will be presented under this grant at no charge for our members and friends.  For those wanting a sneak peak, go to http://www.bryangallery.org/legacy/.  (This workshop will also be given at River Gallery in Brattleboro in June.  Let us know if you would like to receive further information about the workshop in Brattleboro.)

  • No charge, but advanced registration required before April 15.  Register here.

Georgia O’Keeffe: Art Image Style

A Bus Trip to The Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts
by Mickey Myers

George in capeOn behalf of the Gallery, we’ve got to admit, we’re smitten.  Last fall’s trip to the Chagall exhibit in Montreal proved the grass can be greener, if only for a day.  Travel to art destinations has been a particular proclivity of art institutions for decades, as it combines the expertise of curators who often serve as trip hosts, with specialized viewing arrangements, often organized by those curators.  The romance of an archeological dig, a cruise, a private collection can make a vacation not just any vacation.

When we realized a once in a lifetime exhibit of Chagall’s work was mounted just 2 hours to our north in Montreal, we plunged in, and never regretted it.  We were still talking about the joys of what we saw, and looking for the next place to go. . . when we found Georgia.

41dBhgNHV8L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Georgia O’Keeffe: Art, Image and Style, organized by the Brooklyn Museum, was
opening in Brooklyn, and traveling this winter to the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA.  It’s a little farther away than Montreal, but it’s Georgia, who lives in our hearts, as the trailblazer for women artists in the 20th century.  Besides, this exhibit was offering a side of Georgia we did not know, as a stylist, seamstress and fashion icon.

So we hereby offer Bryan Memorial Gallery’s second foray into travel.  It’s still only a day trip, and we have yet to spend the night anywhere.  But if the excitement about going as a group of art aficionados gains strength from this experience, we’ve got a few ideas up our collective sleeves for the next trip.

Bryan Memorial Gallery in cooperation with Goodspeed and Bach Travel (of Burlington and NYC) presents Georgia O’Keeffe Art, Image, Style, a day trip to the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem Massachusetts for a traveling exhibit of art, photographs and fashion by and about the legendary painter, Georgia O’Keeffe (1887 – 1986.)

O'Keeffe Mountains 2Leaving from four locations in Vermont (Burlington, Jeffersonville, Montpelier and White River Junction) on Tuesday, March 27, the bus will depart in the morning, with Bryan Gallery Executive Director Mickey Myers providing an orientation to O’Keeffe’s artwork on route.  Upon arrival in Salem, Massachusetts, lunch will be served at the iconic Hawthorne Hotel, after which travelers will walk over to the Peabody Essex Museum.

Private guides will lead the participants through the exhibition, the first exhibition to explore the art, image and personal style of one of America’s most iconic artists.  O’Keeffe’s understated and carefully designed garments, many never before exhibited, are presented alongside photographs of her, and paintings by her, illuminating O’Keeffe’s unified modernist aesthetic and distinctive self-styling.

georgia-okeeffeFor more than 70 years, O’Keeffe shaped her public persona, defied labels and carved out a truly progressive, independent life in order to create her art. Her aesthetic legacy — compact masses, organic silhouettes, minimal ornamentation, and restrained color palettes — continues to capture the popular imagination and inspire leading designers and tastemakers of our day.  Organized by the Brooklyn Museum, this multi-disciplinary exhibition is the first to focus on the relationship between O’Keeffe’s art and her personal style, including how she was captured on film by the outstanding photographers of her day (including Ansel Adams and O’Keeffe’s husband, Alfred Stiglitz.)

There will be time to explore the exhibition after the tour, and to visit other parts of the museum, including the Peabody Essex Museum’s famed Chinese House: Yin Yu Tang.  The return trip to Vermont will have participants home in the evening.

Georgia 3Goodspeed and Bach Trip Director Deb Flanders will manage the trip which includes entrance to the Peabody Essex Museum, lunch at historic Hawthorne Hotel: appetizer, entrée, dessert and coffee; private guided tour of the exhibition; ticket entrance to the entire museum; tour host and tour manager, luxury motor coach transportation with departures from Burlington and Jeffersonville; gratuity for bus driver and trip manager.

For those interested in giving this trip as a gift, Bryan Memorial Gallery has specifically designed gift certificates available.

To register, go on line to www.bryangallery.org/events.

On Line Art Auction

by Mickey Myers

Bryan Memorial Gallery is presenting its first ever on line art auction, a fundraising event, featuring 71 donated artworks.  The auction raises operating funds for the non-profit art gallery, devoted to New England landscape painting. 

Jan Brough, Lily Pads on #10 Pond 16" x 20" oil
Jan Brough, Lily Pads on #10 Pond
16″ x 20″ oil

On Line Art Auctions, as a vehicle for fundraising, have increased in popularity nationwide, with some presenters raising a major portion of their operating funds from such events.  While Bryan Gallery has held silent auctions as a feature of its fundraising efforts in the past, this is the first time the gallery has isolated the event and limited its presentation exclusively to the Internet.

It’s a new step for us, and two weeks before its conclusion, so far, so good.   In the past, the Gallery had heard from many of its patrons from far away that they could not get to the annual gala, which featured a silent auction, but wanted to see what was available and bid from afar.  After colleagues weighed in with reports of the success of their on line art auctions, the Bryan Gallery Board was willing to give it a try, separating it from a public event.

Jeanne Marler, Winter in Full Splendour 14 x 12 oil
Jeanne Marler, Winter in Full Splendour
14 x 12 oil

Most gratifying so far has been the generosity of artists and donors of artwork.  We even had many artists who were new to us offering artwork to the auction, and an increased number of donations over previous years.  Many of the artists are familiar from their association with the gallery, such as Eric Tobin and Julie Y Baker Albright.  Others are historic figures from the area, such as Walton Blodgett and Robert Barrett. 

The Gallery hired the services of the On Line Auction Company, Bidding Owl, which came recommended from associates, and has proven to be quite user friendly.  Bryan Gallery Manager, Tom Waters, whose responsibility was building the site, expressed appreciation for the easy procedure of posting the auction. 

Mary Bryan, Red Barn with Wagon 5 x 7 pastel
Mary Bryan, Red Barn with Wagon
5 x 7 pastel

He noted that the auction concludes on Saturday, November 11 at 6 PM, and he’s expecting an increase in the number of visitors to the gallery’s website between now and then.  “We expect the last few days to be busy with bids and phone calls.  We’ve re-enforced the staff for the grand finale, and all of us are ready to assist the bidders if necessary.”

So far, there have even been some outright sales from the website.  The Internet has made it possible for us to connect with art lovers everywhere.  Some may visit us on their annual vacations, and increasingly, they stay in touch throughout the year via our website and blog, and social media.  We do it all, and it makes a difference. 

Monique Dewyea, Nymph's Delight 11 x 15 watercolor
Monique Dewyea, Nymph’s Delight
11 x 15 watercolor

Bryan Memorial Gallery’s On Line Art Auction can be accessed through the gallery’s website: www.bryangallery.org.   

2017 Land & Light & Water & Air Awards

By Mickey Myers
At its July Board meeting, the Bryan Memorial Gallery Board reviewed and discussed the unique character of Land and Light and Water and Air, its flagship exhibition, and the presentation of its awards.

The Board declared that Land and Light in particular reflects the unique character of the gallery. While many of the artists who exhibit in the show exhibit elsewhere, such as The Guild of Boston Artists, many are also emerging artists in Northern Vermont. Our exhibits reflect that diversity, and the award winners usually straddle both worlds, due to the professional manner in which we run our gallery, and its educational component.

In selecting a Prize Juror for this year’s exhibit, Nancy Patch was chosen in particular as someone who exists in all those worlds. Nancy is currently the executive director at Artist in Residence cooperative gallery which has been located in St. Albans for the past two years.

She was the founder of AIR in Enosburgh which opened its doors in 2006. She worked for the first five years in Enosburgh as director. This was and is a volunteer position.

In addition Nancy has been collecting works from mostly VT artists for the last 25 plus years and has a current Collection of around 200 paintings and photographs. Many of Nancy’s collection are by artists who have been represented at The Bryan.

Nancy lives in Burlington, but is a Franklin County native with a 6 generation history in VT. She is not an artist, but a lover of art, which is a critical piece of the art world. Nancy also brings her love of community and organizational skills to promoting local, living art and artists.

Without further ado, here are the winners and the juror’s comments on each piece.

First Place: Mary Martin for “After the Rain”

Second Place Neil Berger for “Early Spring”

Third Place: James Coe for “Swamp willows, Deep Snow”

Honorable Mention: Hilary Baldwin for “Resting in the Bay”

Notes on winning pieces by Nancy Patch:
My goal for evaluation of the many wonderful works of art was to find pieces that met all the criteria of the show.  Works that for me included Land, Light, Water, and Air.  I also wanted to have a representation of a diversity of styles if possible.  I put all of this in the context of the history of the Land and Light show, with an understanding of the traditional landscape art that the Bryan gallery is known for.  However I was also looking for that uniqueness and versatility that Mary Bryan celebrated in her own art.

Mary Martin: After the Rain

Mary Martin’s “After the Rain”

This painting just jumped out to me with its two compositional layers.  The right side of the painting “pops” with the fall color and the dramatic rock face (land) and the deftly captured reflection (light) in the river.  This river bend seems to be sheltered from the wind with the trees holding on to their leaves.  As the eye travels around the bend in the river (water) and to the left of the painting the colors soften as fall appears to be more advanced with bare trees whose leaves have fallen with the breeze (air).

Neil Berger: Early Spring

Neil Berger’s “Early Spring”

The painting style here is bold and brave and powerful.  I love the big brush strokes and heavy paint with those bright intertwining colors.  This painting also incorporates all the aspects of the show.  That awesome tree with roots that anchor it to the ground (land) while its colorful branches blow in the wind is remarkable. The shadows (light) of the tree branches laced among its roots are balanced with the actual branches above. The feeling of a strong wind (air) coming of the lake (water) is palpable.  The branches of the tree are dancing as the person nearby sits braced against the wind.  This is a painting that I could never tire of, with its movement and emotion.

James Coe: Swamp Willows, Deep Snow

James Coe’s “Swamp Willows, Deep Snow”

This is the VT that I am so familiar with; shrub swamp (water), abandoned field, and forest edge (land). I love a swamp; as Henry David Thoreau calls them “sanctum, sanctorum”, the holiest of the holies. It is however, the complimentary colors and composition that gives it the most appeal.  The soft airy brush strokes provide a sense of winter cold and calm. The orange of the birch leaves on the edge of the woods in the center of the painting meld with the leaves of the swamp willow in the foreground. This is balanced by the cloudy blue sky and the gray/mauve color of the interior woods, and then contrasted with the stark white of the deep snow that covers the swamp (air and light).  The composition breaks into three tiers of sky, woods, and swamp as the viewer enters through a path in the snow at the very front of the piece.

Hilary Baldwin: Resting in the Bay

Hilary Baldwin’s “Resting in the Bay”

A deeply calming summer scene.  The use of the slight color variations in this painting are so skillfully executed to create a realistic image of the water of the bay as it goes from mud flat (land) and marsh to open water.  The composition works beautifully to fill the space from the lower section of the painting showing the intersection of land and water, the center section of water to sky with the clouds and water merging in similar colors (light) and finally to the clear blue summer sky (air) at the top of the painting.  The marsh grass on the left and right help guide the viewer into the painting.  Composition, color, mood, all there.

Courthouse Update / August 21, 2017 / The Day of the Eclipse

Jeanette Fournier "Song of Spring"
Jeanette Fournier “Song of Spring”

On this auspicious date, Bryan Memorial Gallery’s curators installed the Second Segment of Vermont Landscapes at the Lamoille County Courthouse in Hyde Park. It had been seven months since the prior installation, which was well received to the point that the Courthouse invited Bryan Memorial Gallery to refresh and re-install the paintings, with some more appropriate for the fall and winter months ahead.

So on a day when just about everyone was giddy about the Eclipse of the Moon, Gallery Manager Tom Waters filled his truck with 37 paintings by 18 artists and returned to the now familiar but still hallowed halls of the Courthouse. Among the artists were three watercolorists new to this show: Lisa Forster Beach of Stowe, Kathrena Ravenhorst-Adams of

Kathrena Ravenhost-Adams "Winter on the Farm"
Kathrena Ravenhost-Adams “Winter on the Farm”

Northfield and Jeanette Fournier of Littleton, New Hampshire. Most of the artists previously in the exhibit had returned with new paintings.   Some didn’t have new work to offer, which presented the curators with their first challenge – to make that which was not new look new.

Here is where the flexibility and majesty of the Lamoille County Courthouse comes into play. The building sings. It is lyrical to the point that a painting can be moved and look as good in the second space as it did in the first. It can even look new all over again. Different lighting or wall color can contribute to the viewer’s observation of something they hadn’t seen in the painting the first time.

Lisa Forster Beach "Golden Vermont"
Lisa Forster Beach “Golden Vermont”

With the last installation, the curators had noted that paintings with animals in them had a particular fascination for some of the Courthouse guests, and so they made sure there were several more this time, including two bright bird paintings by Jeanette Fournier. Many of the artists offered paintings of fall and winter scenes: Marilyn James’ “October,” Lisa Beach’s “Golden Vermont,” and John Clarke Olson’s “Winter Barns,” among them.

For us at Bryan Gallery, returning to the Courthouse felt like familiar experience, like an extension of what we normally do, adding a special dimension to the Day of the Eclipse.   Many people will remember this day for a long time, but especially for us at Bryan Memorial Gallery, we will remember the particular satisfaction of returning to the Courthouse to share artwork and artists with a wider community.

More photos and the original post of the Courthouse Gallery can be found here.

Dianne Panarelli Miller and Her Students

by Mickey Myers

Bryan Memorial Gallery presents Dianne Panarelli Miller and Her Students in its Middle Room this summer. 25 paintings by Miller and paintings by 9 of her students are included in the exhibit.

DianneDianne Panarelli Miller, a native of Massachusetts, has been painting since studying at the late commercial art school, Vesper George, in Boston.  One of the last graduates of the school (1983), Miller went on to attend the Ives Gammel Atelier formed by some of the former Vesper George faculty, specifically Robert Douglas Hunter and Robert Cormier.  Her five year atelier education led her to parlay the classic atelier training of the “Boston School,” including a mastery of oil painting technique, with her own personal style, expressed through the harmony of color and design.  When her formal education concluded, Dianne continued.

Painting tirelessly for 35 more years, neither the birth of her daughter nor her employment as a bartender for 17 years distracted her from painting “en plein air,” in natural light, every day.  Her tenacious approach has earned her the distinction as “a Copley Master” at Boston’s legendary Copley Society, in addition to numerous awards.

From her mentors, Miller developed a love of teaching and mentoring herself.  In addition to teaching classes through the South Shore Art Center in Cohasset, MA, Miller offers private painting instruction and provides opportunities for painting trips both in New England and farther afield, including Florida and Europe.  Recently she has returned from painting in Spain with a group of her private students.  MillerSundown

Miller originally came to Bryan Gallery’s attention through the New England Plein Air Painters.  She joined us in 2016 as one of the students in the exhibition ROBERT DOUGLAS HUNTER AND HIS STUDENTS.  Bryan Gallery has been exploring the relationship among students and teachers, particularly when the teacher’s reputation as an artist extends far beyond the classroom.  In getting to know Miller, it became clear that her distinct style of mentoring, including almost daily trips to paint outdoors, regardless of weather, up and down the East Coast, was to be explored.

MillerUpperPleasantValley

In addition to her work in plein air, Miller teaches and is commissioned forportrait work, and also for wedding in situ paintings.  As she has said of herself, “Never one to take the easy way out,” Miller’s boundless energy propels her into a wide spectrum of locations, always working with and encouraging others.  She has said of herself that she can hear the voice of her mentor Robert Douglas Hunter in everything she teaches, as she passes on the lessons that re-shaped her life and her art.

MillerOuttoPastureCurator’s Note:  Dianne Panarelli Miller has painted in many locations in preparation for this exhibit, including familiar situations in Lamoille County, Vermont, where she visited with her students a few months prior to the exhibition.  Subsequently she has returned twice for more plein air sessions.  She is a friendly figure outdoors  in front of an easel, known to carry on a banter with passers-by without taking her eyes off the canvas.  She’s also known to paint a passer-by into a painting, which she reports doing in particular at the beach.  Beach-goers will pass her and on their return, she’ll say, “By the way, you made it into my painting.”  Likewise at weddings, she not only involves the guests by depicting them on her canvas, but also she asks them to make a few strokes of color on the painting, under her direction, so it becomes a genuine keepsake for the new family.

Students of Dianne Panarelli Miller in the exhibit:
Lauren Bass
Bob Beaulieu
Maureen Brookfield
Cheryl Curran
Rita Delvechio
Margaret Finnegan
Ellen Little
Dottie Pentheny
Kate Sotolova